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dr. jennifer hartstein she's a child and adolescent psychologist. >> good morning. >> 400% increase in the last 10 years. why do you think it's been so dramatic? >> it's an incredibly huge increase. i think there's ease of use. >> easy access like the girl said. >> it's in your house, your medicine cabinet. you don't have to seek it out. you can hide it more. the signs aren't there, so the parents can know what you're doing. >> what's also scary, kids are younger and younger. kids as young as 12 years old doing that. >> 12 and older. >> if your kid smokes you can smell the smoke. if your kid drinks you can see they are drunk. if they abuse prescription drugs, how can you tell? >> it's harder. talking about feeling hot, maybe they are nauseous eyes are red, nose running, lethargic, trouble in school. some of the signs are the same. it's much harder to look for. you have to look in your cabinets and see what's going on. >> not just cabinets. aren't there other hot spots. >> medicine cabinet. kitchen, households appliances. garages, they are using inhalan
be benefit the tabloid moniker given to affleck and jennifer lopez his one-time financee. the ups and downs of their two- year relationship landed them on cover after cover. >> that really turned people off the ubiquity of it. it turned me off. >> do we know each other? >> not yet. >> reporter: gile their 2003 box office bomb didn't help. critics called it one of the worse films of the year. >> you don't tell me what to do, okayment don't tell me what we might do. don't tell me what we're supposed to do. don't tell me what we maybe should do. don't ever tell me nothing. >> that movie was supposed to end very differently but because we were in the papers a lot of time, change it. they have to end up together. people want to see them together. it's like, you know, head towards the experts. people want a colder. >> reporter: it put a temporary chill in affleck's career. but he had another goal in mind. >> action. >> reporter: directing his first film. the well received crime thriller gone baby gone starring his brother casey. >> it was scary. it was tough. you know, nothing good. i don't think
study that now says testing women in their 40s would reduce the risk of dying by 26%. dr. jennifer ashton will help us sort it out. >>> also ahead, what do lady gaga and the dall lay lla dall common? they're both on twitter along with about 100 million other people around the world. we'll have to twitter how-to lesson and show you why celebrities in particular love tweeting. >>> but first, we want to get the latest on that big storm all up and down the east coast today. dave price is in wilmington, north carolina. good morning, dave. >> good morning to you, maggie. this is what happens when you get 20 plus inches of rain over four or five days in a row. there's just nowhere for this water to go. and that's the big concern throughout north carolina and, indeed, up and down much of the mid atlantic states as we head through the next 24 hours. right now we broken all sorts of records. you can see the storm system combines the remnants of tropical storm nicole and low pressure system. as a result, a lot of moisture rolling up the eastern seaboard now severe weather is a tlit as well. t
of hollywoodlife.com and our medical corner dr. jennifer act shonn. bonnie, you, of course, covered the premiere. what were the reviews that you got from your reporter about michael douglas? >> he looked fantastic. i saw the pictures myself. he looked robust. he was strong. he didn't look in any way sick. the only thing is, he didn't talk much. he was protecting his voice. >> because, as we know, you know, they can lose their voice from all of the treatment, doctor, right? >> absolutely. it can affect your voice. it can cause hoarseness but the important thing is impact on his nutritional status because with any treatment radiation to the throat it not only kills cancer but it kills or damages the healthy tissue around there also. being able to swallow, being able to eat, being able to drink will all be impaired, and his nutrition will suffer, as anyone knows fighting a chronic illness you need good nutrition. that's going to be his major struggle. >> amazing that he turned out for this, considering what he's going through. >> he looked determined. he had said he wanted to walk the carpet. he's
. by then it was too late to save jennifer hawke-petit and her two daughters. the delay raises the question did the small-town force have the training and resources to save the victims? joining us to talk it over oh, bill stat ton, private investigators and former new york city police officer. good to have you with us. >> thank you. >> i just want to hear your side of this, your feelings. as a former police officer this has to bother you tremendously at the response time was as long as it was for something like . >> this is well, absolutely. but first, let's say, these two gentlemen are evil personified. forotdefense to make the allegation that somehow the police department's fault this actually happened, you know, that's horrendous, out of the question. but, there are a lot of questions that need to be asked and answered. >> do you think it is just as simple as it is cheshire, an affluent town in connecticut, they don't have resources although you would think with the taxes people pay they would but not have the training or not know how to respond to a quote/unquote big city crime like this? >
john gilbride and our other own dr. jennifer ashton. good to see both of you. >> good morning. >> what is it about this and why is the dea doing it now. >> well, when you look at the numbers, it's staggering in terms of the number of people that are abusing prescription drugs. seven million people abuse prescription drugs a 13% increase in just one year. when you look at the number of teenagers that are abusing prescription drugs, it's frightening. 2500 teens, on average, every day use prescription drugs to get high for the very first time. so, operation takeback is a chance to get those drugs out of the medicine cabinet where they're just sitting there waiting to be abused. >> jen, as a doctor, how rampant is the abuse that you see in your own office and what is the seriousness of it? because i think a lot of people miss that point this all of this. >> well, i think we don't really know how rampant it is. those numbers we just saw are just really estimates and the fear in medicine, clinical medicine, this key even be worse. i think a lot of people fall in the habit of use, abuse and d
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6